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U.S. Terrorism: Drone Strikes Are Killing Children

Robert Greenwald, a documentarian is working on a new film, Drones Exposed, and though it is sad that we live in a world in which there has to be a documentary about drones and their repugnant aftermath, it is nevertheless important that we do not remain in the dark about what is happening in our name.

Regardless of the fraught so-called strategic outlook on why we use drones, having the blood of 178 children (if not more) on our hands is a national issue that we, as U.S. citizens or any conscientious person must address; it is the anti-War issue of our time. Imagine how many countless families we have brought pain and devastation to with these phantom-like air machines raining death and destruction from the skies? And just imagine the unheard repercussions of the drone strikes: each survivor will tell their family and friends that the bombs that killed their loved ones read, “Made in the USA.” Questions will be raised such as “Why do they hate us?”

A vital question remains unacknowledged: Do we have any idea what terrorism really is?

Although we heavily criticize Bill Maher for his ridiculous and excessive anti-Muslim bigotry, as the expression goes “even a broken clock is right twice a day,”

We utilize the best means at our disposal to go into foreign lands and blow up the people we consider the bad guys even if that means collateral damage in the form of civilian casualties. When someone does that exact same thing to us, don’t we call it “terrorism”?

Below is a short video and report by Robert Greenwald exposing what Drones truly do: destroy and terrorize:

U.S. Drone Strikes Are Causing Child Casualties: Video and Report

by Robert Greenwald, HuffingtonPost

During my recent trip to Pakistan as part of our upcoming documentary film, Drones Exposed, I was struck most by the stories told to me by children who had experienced a U.S. drone strike firsthand. The impact of America’s drone war in the likes of Pakistan and Yemen will linger on, especially for the loved ones of the 178 children killed in those countries by U.S. drone strikes.

War Costs’ latest video (with accompanying report) brings attention to the children who have died as a result of drone strikes. The video names some of the children who perished in these strikes, and points out the obfuscation tactics of American officials who will not own up to the significant amount of civilian casualties that have occurred due to this legally- and morally-dubious policy.

In addition to the video, War Costs offers this report detailing the effects of drone strikes on children. The findings come mainly from the diligent investigative reporting of TBIJ and the groundbreaking reports on the impact of drone strikes by Stanford and New York University researchers (Living Under Drones: Death, Injury and Trauma to Civilians from US Drone Practices in Pakistan) and researchers at Columbia University (The Civilian Impact of Drones: Unexamined Costs, Unanswered Questions). 

In an effort to compel answers about why these innocent civilians have died without acknowledgement or explanation from the U.S. government, War Costs is calling on the U.S. House of Representatives to debate and pass Rep. Dennis Kucinich’s bill that calls for more transparency regarding U.S. drone strike policy. For more on War Costs’ upcoming drones film, visit our website, or at Facebook and Twitter.

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  • Jake

    Worthy & Unworthy .. Victims

  • Pingback: U.S. Terrorism: Drone Strikes Are Killing Children | Properganda | Scoop.it()

  • Just Stopping By

    @Ilisha: Yup. I can’t see how anyone could actually believe that there are not double standards at the UN and in the application of international law. I still think there is a point to knowing exactly what the law says, even if the US does often (nearly always?) get away with not following the law in either letter or spirit.

  • Just Stopping By

    @Ilisha:

    Thanks. From the quote, I’m still not sure whether that is a legal point or a discussion on the vast nature of starting an illegal war, but I will try to look into it.

    The point actually has some resemblance to felony murder in that it makes the initial actor responsible for actions other than just the one intended (“when an offender kills accidentally or without specific intent to kill in the commission of a felony, the offender can be charged with murder.”) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Felony_murder_rule.

    Anyway, I want to look into it a bit more, but I am glad that you had material to support your point, which is in fact quite interesting.

  • Just Stopping By

    @Ilisha and @Garibaldi:

    “According to international law, the US bears ultimate responsibility for, “the whole of the evil” because they unleashed an unjust war, most clearly in Iraq, a supreme international crime. This was decided a Nuremberg and must not be forgotten. When militias kill post invasion, the US shares responsibility for each and every crime.”

    Thanks. I was not aware of this (which is why I, and probably others) have overlooked this point. Is there a link or a citation where I can get more information on this?

  • Garibaldi

    @Ilisha,

    I think this is a crucial point overlooked by many,

    “According to international law, the US bears ultimate responsibility for, “the whole of the evil” because they unleashed an unjust war, most clearly in Iraq, a supreme international crime. This was decided a Nuremberg and must not be forgotten. When militias kill post invasion, the US shares responsibility for each and every crime.”

  • Anti Loon

    I was having a conversation with my friend and he said there are more people killed in Iraq by civil war than invading armies. is this true? is there any stats available regarding these? also he said there are more people killed by muslims than any other between 2000-2010

  • We as a society are enraged when a young girl is shot for wanting an education, but seemingly untroubled when 178 or more children are killed by drones. Let us come to our senses and let the madness stop. Just say no to drones!

  • Xithurel

    @Nevermore

    Oh I never meant to imply anything wrong with what you said I merely wanted to expand the argument.

    No more than counties seeking nuclear standing in the world should have known better; and yet the rationale behind the very concept was: deterrence. With each time America in particular comes up with a new method for warfare, countries had to adapt using that very same principle. Otherwise what keeps America or any other super power from invading countries? Escalation, in general is what gives businesses, of whom invest in conflict, their fix and influence.

  • Delberto

    Is anyone watching the Oliver Stone special The Untold Story of the United States.

    USA are creating enemies on purpose, they have to. First they scared us with Communism and now it is Islam.

    Jesus make them come to their senses, we can live in a world of peace if we want it.

  • @Amago

    I don’t think anyone should be surprised by the fact that our drones are killing children. This is really sad through.

  • muhammed

    very depressing to see children such as these dead, caused from violence resulting from adult hatred. this can only create karma that leads to more violence and more deaths of helpless children.

  • Al

    The presidental trainwreck, Barry Sotero likes to kill kids with UAVs (drones). He likes to kill American kids with UAVs too; RE: Abdulrahman Al-Awlaki. Drone strikes, coming to a suburb near you!

  • tarig

    @Ilisha

    That article is heart wrenching, I strongly recommend you cross post it, it really puts things in to perspective!

  • Nevermore

    @Xithurel: Er…my analysis was based on American usage of drone strikes because that’s what was mnetioned in the article? You’ll find that I agree more than disagree with your analysis. There’s a reason that I mentioned it started: public image. It’s an easy way for Presidents Obama and Bush to say that progress is being made on the War on Terror (even if that’s not the case), simply because it means American lives aren’t at stake. You’re quite right when you state it’s a dangerous thing and a slippery slope. I was just stating the reason I believe it was initially implemented. They knew/know the U.S. grows tired of the endless occupation of Iraq and Afghanistan. It’s just trying to put a nice bow on things and makes war ‘presentable.’ This is what I meant about troop casualties.

    It’s also why I stated that anyone can protest as much as they’d like, but why the situation is very unlikely to change. It’s going to be hard to convince the American public to back to the old ways because a drone strike isn’t going to result in American deaths (or at least not likely to). I think maybe you misread what I was trying to state. The issues is not whether or not they SHOULD be used (for the record, I don’t believe so, no), but how the Bush and Obama Administrations justified/justify it. It’s for this reason I see the situation as more or less hopeless. I really don’t know how what could be done barring some momentous crisis of conscience which…

    “America alone in it’s utter moral bankruptcy has set the stage to a new kind of war.”

    …Doesn’t say too much, considering that, as you mentioned, lots of countries are going to follow in the U.S.’ footsteps in this regard. It’s only the beginning. In fact, I’d honestly say it’s WORSE when these other countries begin to adopt similar methods. You’d think they’d know better.

  • Waqas

    Why is Apple denying Americans information about their governnment’s drone attacks?

    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/akramsrazor/2012/11/why-is-apple-denying-american-voters-information-about-drone-attacks/

  • Xithurel

    @Nevermore

    Your assessment is based on America being the sole owner of Drones. That is no longer the case, because of this new type of cowardly warfare; drones have become the nuclear faceoff of the 21rst century. Russia, China, Japan, middle eastern countries, and beyond are all developing their own drones now.

    So how safe are Americans going to be when Pakistan develops it’s own drones? By law alone it has every right to retaliate against America for breaching it’s boarders by bombing it’s people – basically a declaration of war.

    The Drone is the Frankenstein monstrosity that has no redeeming qualities whatsoever.

    It turns war into a game, it renders the ethics of warfare with all the horrors moot, it dehumanizes populations – thus waging war won’t be so hard to do. You can’t compel conscience in a people who have no contact to the agony of war. If they can’t feel the cost of it, they have no incentive to prevent it much less avoid it.

    It’s not really about troop casualties it’s about waging war absolutely unchecked. But people are fooling themselves if they actually think this new type of war will render them untouchable – it’s the exact opposite.

    Thanks to Bush and Obama they have demonstrated that countries and their boarders no longer are of any concern. That there is no such thing as ‘A Day of Infamy’ but that bombing countries, including allied ones, bare absolutely no consequences.

    This is the greatest disaster waiting to happen. America alone in it’s utter moral bankruptcy has set the stage to a new kind of war. Where civilians are the targets and that there is no such thing as innocent people.

    It NEVER should have gone this far. But now that it has, people can either sit on their hands and shrug; or they can get up and start putting right all the wrongs. They can start by bringing the Bush administration to justice in front of the whole world; there is absolutely no justifying not doing that. But if they can’t even do that, then nobody should ever complain when drones start flying over American skies. this all just has to stop, period.

  • Nevermore

    There’s a reason for drone strikes, which is ultimately quite simple: lots of people die in them. As the ‘forever war’ has dragged itself on for more than a decade, and the fruitlessness of the situations in Iraq and Afghanistan has come to bear, the U.S. has searched for easy victories. My country has been troubled by the fact that the situation is little better than it was in 2001.

    This approach literally allows the military to take the gain of dead enemy combatants (anyone else is an unfortunate casualty) without the loss of American troops. We can raise awareness as much as we’d like, but I doubt it will change. The fact of the matter is is that the U.S. benefits from this approach and there are little drawbacks except muted criticism sometimes from a disillusioned left and foaming-at-the-mouth right. We are likely looking at the future of warfare here, much like how nuclear weapons changed the name of the game after WWII.

    And if you’ll pardon the awful word for a moment, little will be done because to those who see this as a way to punish the people for ‘supporting’ terrorists (and the vicious cycle this creates leaves little wonder why)…

    Well, they’re “just sand n*****s,” right?

  • Garibaldi

    @Amago,

    Thank you for the article, as well as informing us of the video. What I find interesting is that while I think Dennis Kucinich’s initiative is a good one, it recommends a reduction of drones if I recall and not an elimination of drones.

    I guess that would be a good first step though!

  • Xithurel

    War OF terror perpetrated by a Christian governed military collective called US NATO forces against civilian cities, towns, villages – that’s how religious history will speak of the 21rst century. People can call it any way they want; it doesn’t change the fact that the dynamics are in fact Christians massacring Muslims without pause.

    In a historical school textbook context it will read: ‘ Geneva convention was nullified at the turn of the 21rst century; as NATO forces and the American government bypassed both the United States Congress and the United Nations to invade both allied countries and countries under fraudulent intelligence, in a war that would later be called The War of Terror.

    The War of Terror would begin with the invasion of a sovereign country called Iraq. Where hundreds of thousands of Iraqis would die and millions of Iraqis displaced, orphaned, and to this day suffer from uranium poisoning due to the US unchecked use of uranium enriched military hardware; which in turn is still killing the children of Iraq.

    The war of Terror would later expand through out the middle east, and West Asia; primarily in Allied nation Pakistan and poverty stricken nation of Afghanistan, and Arab countries. For decades The War of Terror continued on without pause and in an effort to minimize NATO and US forces causalities; the use of unmanned weapons of mass destruction were used. This had an effect in preventing causalities of troops but not against civilian populations. The casualty rate would double among the civilians. Throughout the west Asian and Middle eastern region civilian death numbered in the hundreds of thousands over the span of a decade alone. These deaths were called Collateral Damage, a term used to dilute, dehumanize, and anesthetize the severity in the targeting of civilians to the people of America and NATO countries. Countless civilians were slaughtered ( the numbers to this day are still being estimated ) but the war continued on through the use of propaganda, and scare media, similar to the tactics first used by the Third Reich in Nazi Germany during WW2 against Jews. These wars would have a devastating impact in NATO countries and America. Crashing the world economy, suppression of freedoms and rights to the American people by the installment of the Patriot Act and the National Defense Authorization Act or NDAA. Thus a new kind of warfare and a new line of aggression would be met with the escalation of the technological advances of warfare.

    The UN would eventually dissolve, in the same manner the League of Nations had; after it failed to prevent the cataclysmic atrocities that would lead to what would be World War Three.

    But I presume that humanity actually survives WW3 to write this. In any case, history will judge this age with nothing but harshness and condemnation for what we are allowing to happen.

  • mindy1

    I think we use drones(not saying right or wrong)is because when the average American hears of military casualties, it distresses us, and we look to technology to keep casualties to our guys down-again, not saying right or wrong, just trying to guess.

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