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India: Villagers attack police who prevented child marriages

Child Brides

Every year around the world, an estimated 10 million girls are married before they turn 18, according to Girls Not Brides, an organization devoted to ending the practice of child marriage.

Islamophobes portray the problem of child marriage as unique to Muslims in their relentless effort to demonize Islam. They scour the Internet, cherry picking incidents that serve their agenda–or simply make something up: Anti-Muslim Blogoshpere Runs Amuck: Forced to Eat Crow.

Child marriage is a widespread problem should be tackled for the benefit of girls and young women, not politicized for the purpose to spreading hate. Don’t expect to read about it in the looniverse, but recent events in Rajasthan clearly illustrate this problem is not unique to Muslim communities.

India: Villagers attack police who prevented child marriages

In the Jhalawar District of Rajasthan, 30 minors were being illegally married in a group.

By Spero News

At least six police and administration officials were injured when they were attacked by a group of villagers who was conducting child marriages in Rajasthan’s Jhalawardistrict, police said in India. The villagers even attacked a police outpost later. Police arrested 15 villagers on April 21 and lodged first information reports (FIR) against 50 others.

The incident took place on the evening of April 20 inGhatoli area of the district. “We were on high alert in the wake of Akshaya Tritiya (Akha Teej) that is to be observed April 24,” a police official said.

Akshaya Tritiya or Akha Teej is considered one of the most auspicious days of the year for Hindu and Jain communities. Acting on a tip-off that about 30 minors were being illegally married in a group wedding ceremony at Prithavipura village, a team of district and police officials was rushed to the spot.

The officers asked the villagers to show the birth certificates of the grooms and brides. But when they refused, the team asked the villagers to stop the weddings.

“Enraged villagers then started pelting stones at the officers following which six of them were injured,” said the official.

The state home department had asked the district administration and police to keep strict vigil on child marriages on Akha Teej, which is a rampant practice in the rural areas of Rajasthan.

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  • RDS

    @Zakariya: I lost it at the sharia-compliant kaiju. ROTFL

  • Zakariya Ali Sher

    @ Ben and Reynardine: Are you guys sure he’s not talking about some sort of hypothetical post-apocalyptic sci-fi/horror world where people are having sex with zombie chicks. I mean, hot zombie chicks obviously. Like Melinda Clarke in Return of the Living Dead III or that goth chick from Zombie Strippers. Not sure how halal that is. But then, I suppose we probably spend too much time researching shariah compliant kaiju and Muslamic ray guns 😀

  • Reynardine

    In fact, I saw that. It’s clearly the opinion of someone abnormal, and aroused disgust in Muslims and non- Muslims alike. Someone said wives had a reciprocal claim in their dead husband’s corpses, and someone else asked how it could be exercised. Rigor mortis was discussed (and disgust). A lot of this, I suspect, was morgue humor…

  • Benjamin Taghiov

    Today, Egypt’s state-owned Al Ahram newspaper published an opinion piece by Amr Abdul Samea, a past stalwart supporter of the deposed Hosni Mubarak, that contained a bombshell: Egypt’s parliament is considering passing a law that would allow husbands to have sex with their wives after death.

    It was soon mentioned in an English language version of Al-Arabiya and immediately started zipping around social-networking sites. By this afternoon it had set news sites and the rest of the Internet on fire. It has every thing: The yuck factor, “those creepy Muslims” factor, the lulz factor for those with a sick sense of humor. The non-fact-checked Daily Mail picked it up and reported it as fact. Then Andrew Sullivan, who has a highly influential blog but is frequently lax about fact-checking, gave it a boost with an uncritical take. The Huffington Post went there, too.

    There’s of course one problem: The chances of any such piece of legislation being considered by the Egyptian parliament for a vote is zero. And the chance of it ever passing is less than that. In fact, color me highly skeptical that anyone is even trying to advance a piece of legislation like this through Egypt’s parliament. I’m willing to be proven wrong. It’s possible that there’s one or two lawmakers completely out of step with the rest of parliament. Maybe.

    SEE ALSO – IN PICTURES: Behind the veil

    But extreme, not to mention inflammatory claims, need at minimum some evidence (and I’ve read my share of utter nonsense in Al Ahram over the years). The evidence right now? Zero.

    There was a Moroccan cleric a few years back who apparently did issue a religious ruling saying that husbands remained married to their wives in the first six hours after death and, so, well, you know. But that guy is far, far out on the nutty fringe. How fringe? He also ruled that pregnant women can drink alcohol. Remember, alcohol is considered haram, forbidden, by the vast majority of the world’s Muslim scholars. Putting an unborn child at risk to get drunk? No, that’s just not what they do. Whatever the mainstream’s unpalatable beliefs (there are plenty from my perspective) this isn’t one of them.

    It’s important to remember that the structure of the Muslim clergy is, by and large, like that of a number of Protestant Christian sects. Anyone can put out a shingle and declare themselves a preacher. The ones to pay attention to are the ones with large followings, or attachment to major institutions of Islamic learning. The preacher in Morocco is like the preacher in Florida who spent so much time and energy publicizing the burning of Qurans.

    Stories like this are already a reminder of the downside of the Internet. It makes fact-checking and monitoring easier. But the proliferation of aggregation sites, newsy blog sites, and the general erosion of editorial standards (and on-the-ground reporters to do the heavy lifting) also spreads silliness faster than it ever could before.

    http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Backchannels/2012/0426/Egypt-necrophilia-law-Hooey-utter-hooey

  • Black Infidel

    Indian teenager annuls her child ‘marriage’

    A young woman has had her child “marriage” legally annulled in northern Rajasthan state, in what is thought to be the first case of its kind in India.

    Laxmi Sargara, 18, wed Rakesh when she was just one and he was three.

    She grew up with her own family, only finding out she was married when her in-laws came to claim her this month.

    Child marriages are illegal in India but are still common in many parts of the country, especially in rural and poorer communities.

    “I was unhappy about the marriage. I told my parents who did not agree with me, then I sought help,” Laxmi told Agence France Presse (AFP) news agency.

    She knew nothing of her future life until a few days ago when her groom’s family came to take her home with them to start her new life as Rakesh’s wife.

    ‘Depressed’

    After appealing to her parents Laxmi sought help from a local non-governmental organisation, the Sarathi Trust in Jodhpur city.

    “She got depressed. She did not like the boy and was not ready to go ahead with her parents’ decision,” Sarathi Trust worker Kriti Bharti told AFP.

    “It is the first example we know of a couple wed in childhood wanting the marriage to be annulled and we hope others take inspiration,” Kriti Bharti added.

    At first Rakesh wanted to go ahead with the marriage. But he relented after counselling from the NGO.

    Since child marriages are not legal under India’s Prohibition of Child Marriage Act, both Laxmi and Rakesh signed an affidavit declaring the marriage null and void in the presence of a notary public in Jodhpur.

    Narayan Bareth, a journalist in the state capital Jaipur, says a recent survey found that 10% of girls in Rajasthan are married off before the age of 18.

    There have been several cases of young girls refusing to get married in India but these are rare cases, correspondents say.

    According to Unicef, 40% of the world’s child marriages take place in India, although recent efforts to stop the practice mean the number of such marriages has declined.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-india-17838022

  • mindy1

    How pathetic-girls should not be married off before they have had a chance to enjoy life 🙁

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