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CCIF’s anti-Islamophobia ads banned from public transport in Paris

Lila Charef hints that that these ads were not banned because of “political and religious connotations” but rather for reasons yet not clear.

CCIF spokeswoman Lila Charef said: “Just because a poster shows a religious symbol, does not make it religious. On the contrary, our message is all-inclusive. We are still asking ourselves about the real motivation of this refusal.

“This campaign targets prejudice, Islamaphobia and stigmatising dialogue which divides citizens rather than bringing them together while our country moves through a difficult period socially and economically.”

In a country like France in which freedom of expression should be cherished, it is being maligned.  It almost seems as if this ad was banned because it was anti-Islamophobic not because of its political and religious connotations.

(Via Islamophobia-Watch.com)

CCIF’s anti-Islamophobia ads banned from public transport in Paris

An anti-Islamophobia campaign has been banned from Paris public transport because of its political and religious connotations.

The publicity section of buses and Metro authority RATP, Médiatransport, has banned three posters by the Collectif contre l’Islamophobie en France (CCIF).

The CCIF has made public a letter explaining RATP’s conclusion that the appearance of symbols like the veil, payots (side curls worn by Orthodox Jews) and crucifixes alongside the phrase “We (too) are the nation” plus the French flag was politically charged.

One of the posters of the “We (too) are the nation” campaign is a reworking of the Tennis Court Oath painting by Jacques-Louis David (depicting a key meeting in the run-up to the French Revolution), redesigned to give a more diverse range of religious and ethnic identities to the figures involved.

CCIF spokeswoman Lila Charef said: “Just because a poster shows a religious symbol, does not make it religious. On the contrary, our message is all-inclusive. We are still asking ourselves about the real motivation of this refusal.

“This campaign targets prejudice, Islamaphobia and stigmatising dialogue which divides citizens rather than bringing them together while our country moves through a difficult period socially and economically.”

The Connexion, 14 November 2012

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  • Michael Elwood

    @Garibaldi

    you’re welcome.

  • Pingback: CCIF’s anti-Islamophobia ads banned from public transport in Paris | Islamophobia Today eNewspaper

  • Truth Hurts

    voltaire où êtes-vous?

    (Yes, I know that he didn’t really say the “I’ll defend to the death” bit ;-) )

    Freedom of Speech is yolked to expedient opportunism. Neo-colonialism c’est la vie…

  • Garibaldi

    Thanks for the tip Michael.

  • Michael Elwood

    It took a while, but Pamela Geller’s ads finally made an appearance here in Chicago:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/15/cta-anti-muslim-ads-contr_n_2136432.html

    The reaction here was the same as the reaction in New York. Some Jewish leaders quickly pointed out that this crazy broad doesn’t speak for them.

  • http://www.yellow-stars.com eslaporte

    First of all, secularism to the point of absurdity is well known out of France. The conception of French Republicanism is that religion must be sanitized from public display.

    The French should realize that “France” includes Catholics, Jews, Muslims, Atheists, and the like.

    Second, why isn’t Islamophobic speech also “religious?” It is to demonize a religion, and thus a religious discussion – unless the it’s the Fortuynian notion that “Islam is an ideology.” Then isn’t Catholicism also an ideology? Especially since Catholicism allows no room for dissent?

  • Reynardine

    I downloaded that wonderful poster. Too bad there are still troglodytes in the street honking, “Algèrie francaise!”

  • Hard Core Atheist

    Sorry, not sure how this isn’t religious. No doubt France has a climate of islamaphobia, but in my opinion the use of religious symbols makes it religious. It’s not preachy, but it’s certainly religious. The organization who developed the poster is a religious organization, with images of religions asking for society to be more inclusive to religious people. It’s a great message, but religious nonetheless.

  • Sarah Brown

    In a sense it *is* ‘politically charged’ – campaigning against bigotry could be said to be political. I think it seems wrong to interpet ‘political’ so broadly in this context – i.e. with the effect that the ad. is banned. I also agree that the use of the religious symbol does not make the poster religious.

  • http://www.youtube.com/user/GargamelGold CriticalDragon1177

    @Amago

    Hopefully their won’t be a double standard, and they’ll let the French equivalent of Geller post a bigoted anti Muslim add in their public transit system. I don’t really know what to do about this through. I might try to start a petition, but I wouldn’t know who to direct the petition at.

  • http://loonwatch sam muhammad

    Fight fire with fire..new nyc bus ads ‘In the choice between savages [talmud 'women are sacks of excrement with bleeding holes'] and the civilized quran ['and believing men and believing women will have their reward with their Lord'] always choose civilization

  • Sir David ( aged 13 3/4 )

    Mustafa
    That’s going to help a great deal……..not
    Strange idea I about being humble. Where does it come from?

    Sir David
    Angers 49000
    France

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  • Sheikh Prospect Mustafa

    Then the Muslims in France must simply stop trying to appease and even be a part of the arrogant and secular-fascist “nation” which doesn’t want them. Being humble toward the arrogant is a big sin in Islam.

  • http://www.loonwatch.com Garibaldi

    Blatant hypocrisy.

  • Xithurel

    France, yet again. Guess Freedom of Speech is really Freedom to preach hate.

    Maybe if it were anti semitic and mocking circumcision they would have allowed it.

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